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Some Things Are Good

The Wrong Shall Fail, The Right Prevail
Others have said it better than I could - in particular, Judge Vaughn R. Walker. I direct you here, for his thorough, and scathing, smackdown review of and ruling on Prop 8 proponents' arguments. (After reading this, I'd be surprised if anyone on the Prop 8 legal team didn't go into court knowing that their arguments were as logically air-tight and waterproof as a screen door on a submarine.) Apparently, some other constitutional scholars think the ruling has a healthy chance of survival in higher court. That's even better.

I have all the intellectual capacity of runny cottage cheese tonight, but my heart is happy. Something that - all rationalizations ripped mercilessly aside - denied civil rights to human beings, has had a great and, hopefully, mortal blow struck against it.

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
denara
Aug. 5th, 2010 05:53 am (UTC)
I love that he's a Reagan appointee too!

(Eh, I'm not running on much myself, so please forgive if the next bit doesn't come out sounding very kind...)

But sometimes I wonder.... seriously, why does the Bay Area always have to be the only knocking sense into this fucked up state? Why can't it be a judge in San Diego or some conservative town doing it ... because the nutjob section of republicans love to demonize us, it'd carry a lot more power if a judge down there had done it.
kaffyr
Aug. 5th, 2010 05:58 am (UTC)
I understand what you're saying in terms of public/political perception. It's frustrating that it has to come from one geographic/cultural base, and isn't recognized as well elsewhere. But that's probably been the case for every progressive step in terms of human rights, and not just in this country. Urban areas with a history of accepting diversity culturally are always going to be among the first areas from which judicial or political figures are able to articulate clearly - and successfully - the logical reasons for human rights.
denara
Aug. 5th, 2010 06:21 am (UTC)
getting rambly here lol...
It's funny though, even every republican I knew voted no on that prop. There's a strong libertarian presence here too in the south bay/silicon valley though so I guess I shouldn't be too surprised.

The really strange part looking back is that growing up I used to think I lived in such a hick conservative area, despite having the guy who was the first admitted atheist congressman (and I met him on a DC trip in HS and looking back, dude! it hadn't come out at the time, but def didn't hurt him much come elections)... even all the mormon friends I had in high school would go up to the city for the pride parade.

That was likely part of the original problem. People up here took it too much for granted. We see adoption adverts targeted specifically to gay couples on public transport, you forget there might be problems outside our little bubble. "Why would any Californian possibly vote against human rights, we're totally different from the rest of the US!!" ... not quite. Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Washington, D.C def have us beat... but with 10% of the population living here, imagine the precedent it would set!!
kaffyr
Aug. 6th, 2010 12:38 am (UTC)
Re: getting rambly here lol...
I hadn't thought about the Libertarian aspect of it, but you're absolutely right! And I understand the perception tricks that geography plays; living in Chicago, particularly on the North Side, tricks one into thinking everyone believes in human rights. Then one travels to the South Side, or downstate ... welcome to the real world.

Hopefully, however, the reality will be a little more progressive soon!
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )