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October 26th, 2010

Scattershot

Scattered Thoughts in the Mechanic's Waiting Room
I'm sitting in Smitty's, waiting for my poor old Taurus to be outfitted with a battery cable harness. Outside, the wind's trying to get in, and the weirdly warm weather of the past two months continues. I've got work to do, once the car's back in my possession, but for now, I've sent one story in to my editor (from the garage! On the Internet! I love living in the future!) and I'll grab five minutes for myself. Not much time for long-form thought, of course, but perfect for bite-sized commentary.
  • I somehow managed to get myself elected president (effective January) of my condo association. This is ... less than optimal, but no one else would do it, and the previous president was leaving the job after eight years. Coming up? Making sure the new treasurer keeps finances up to date (because our old treasurer is moving); getting a full plumbing assessment of the entire building, complete with recommendations on how to solve our long-term problems — and somehow not panicking at having gotten myself into this position.
  • Yes, there was more plumbing fun. Luckily, it was largely undertaken outside our house. Unluckily, it cost the association $1,000 or so. Hence the need for a full plumbing assessment ....
  • Rewatched Moffat and Gatiss' Sherlock on Sunday. I still like it, I still am truly in awe of the acting abilities of Cumberbatch and Freeman (the latter especially), and I am even more cautious about Moffat's tendency to be too, too clever in his plotting, instead of being intelligent in it. Still, the acting is excellent, and I confess to adoring the the music. So I'll watch the next two.
  • Rewatched more Jeremy Brett last night (The Dancing Men) and was reminded that Brett is Holmes, now and forever. Even in this early outing, he inhabited the character in a way Doyle would have been amazed by. The ability of Brett, his acting companions, the writers and directors, to take the original stories and translate them — nearly unchanged, but completely engrossing, despite their Victorian pace and worldview — is unparalleled. (I was amused to learn that Brett was a family friend as Cumberbatch was growing up, and that Cumberbatch made some of his character choices based on Brett's interpretation.)
And that, I think, is the end of my maunderings for now.